• Interdisciplinary Project Incubator

    The Deakin Science and Society Network is committed to supporting science-literate social research and socially-engaged science that makes an impact. It aspires to be an engine for interdisciplinary collaboration at Deakin University. The Interdisciplinary Project Incubator is the network’s flagship scheme. Launched in 2018, it is an innovative approach to supporting interdisciplinary collaborations for early- and mid-career researchers (EMCARs).

    Key documents:


    What is the Interdisciplinary Project Incubator?

    The Interdisciplinary Project Incubator is a pilot program developed by the Deakin Science and Society Network. Its aim is to provide Deakin EMCARs with resources, tools and training to conduct high quality and impactful interdisciplinary, collaborative research.

    What kind of support does it provide?

    The Incubator will provide up to $10,000 of seed funding, provide support for mentorship, provide regular feedback on project development (including the development of category 1 and category 2-4 grant proposals), and will assist in brokering collaborative interdisciplinary relationships.

    What counts as interdisciplinary, collaborative research?

    While there are many forms of interdisciplinary collaboration, this scheme is specifically designed to support collaborations between researchers in STEM disciplines (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) and the HASS disciplines (humanities and social sciences). Projects that involve collaboration between only STEM disciplines or between only HASS disciplines are unlikely to be successful in their applications.

    How do I apply?

    Complete and submit the application form together with a single page CV/s for each investigator to artsed-research-grants@deakin.edu.au. Submit all forms and CVs together as one pdf document. Please include a statement of the amount of FTE equivalent time elapsed since the conferral of your PhD taking into account periods of leave, time working in industry, etc. Shortlisted applicants will be expected to give a 15-minute presentation to an SSN selection committee in late September 2019.

    Applications for the Interdisciplinary Project Incubator are now open and will officially close midnight 9 September 2019.

    If you have any questions or queries please contact ARTSED Research Grants at artsed-research-grants@deakin.edu.au

    Launch of the Interdisciplinary Project Incubator at the EMCAR Development Network “Developing Interdisciplinary Research,” Prof Emma Kowal, ARC Future Fellow –  Deakin University Melbourne Burwood Campus, Tuesday, 12 June, 4:30pm to 6:30pm

    Presentation slides: SSN Interdisciplinary Project Incubator presentation 2018 (Powerpoint slides)

  • Interdisciplinary Establishment Grant

    The Deakin Science and Society Network is committed to supporting science-literate social research and socially-engaged science that makes an impact. It aspires to be an engine for interdisciplinary collaboration at Deakin University. The Interdisciplinary Establishment Grant is the second scheme launched by the SSN. It support proposals for activities by Deakin University early and mid-career academic researchers (EMCARs) aimed at establishing new interdisciplinary research collaborations.


    Key documents:


    What is the Interdisciplinary Establishment Grant?

    The Interdisciplinary Establishment Grant is designed to support proposals for activities by Deakin University early and mid-career academic researchers (EMCARs) aimed at establishing new interdisciplinary research collaborations. Activities should be targeted at one or more of the following:

    • Providing opportunities to communicate new ideas and create new collaborations and networks across disciplines;
    • Enabling researchers to learn about methods and/or work being undertaken in different disciplines;
    • Facilitating development of new interdisciplinary research collaborative relationships and projects.

    What kind of activities are eligible for support?

    Examples of activities eligible for support include:

    • The organisation of an interdisciplinary workshop aimed at exposing participants from different disciplines to new methods, environments or ideas.
    • The organisation of interdisciplinary meet-up events aimed at creating introductions and establishing new collaborative relationships and networks.
    • Supporting conference attendance in disciplines outside of your own to meet prospective collaborative partners and engage with researchers from different disciplines.
    • The organisation of a small, interdisciplinary symposium in which researchers from different disciplines come together to present papers on a shared topic.
    • Visiting research groups or individual researchers to develop new collaborations.
    • Sponsorship of researcher(s) to travel to visit a Deakin researcher/research group to deliver a talk, seminar, masterclass, or workshop.
    • Employment of a research assistant to conduct a literature review on a new interdisciplinary research topic in preparation for a collaborative research project (grant proposal and/or publications).

    Please note that activities are not restricted to this list, we encourage the submission of innovative ideas and proposals that create or develop interdisciplinary collaborative relationships by Deakin EMCARs.

    What counts as interdisciplinary, collaborative research?

    While there are many forms of interdisciplinary collaboration, this scheme is specifically designed to support collaborations between researchers in STEM disciplines (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) and the HASS disciplines (humanities and social sciences). Projects that involve collaboration between only STEM disciplines or between only HASS disciplines are unlikely to be successful in their applications.

    What kind of support does it provide?

    Individual proposals are eligible for up to $5000 in funding. Proposals for activities of all sizes and budgets are encouraged. Co-funded projects are also eligible and encouraged.

    How do I apply?

    Complete and submit the application form together with a single page CV/s to artsed-research-grants@deakin.edu.au. Submit all forms and CVs together as one pdf document. Please include a statement of the amount of FTE equivalent time elapsed since the conferral of your PhD taking into account periods of leave, time working in industry, etc. Successful applicants may be asked to give a presentation at an interdisciplinary research day in 2020.

    Applications for the Interdisciplinary Establishment Grant are now open and will officially close midnight 9 September 2019.

    If you have any questions or queries please contact ARTSED Research Grants at artsed-research-grants@deakin.edu.au

  • Visiting Scholars Program

    The SSN Visiting Scholars Program is designed to provide emerging scholars engaged in exciting interdisciplinary research an opportunity to be hosted at any School, Strategic Research Centre or Institute of Deakin University for a period of 1-3 months. Visiting Scholars should be in engaged in research activities that align with one of the SSN’s four research themes:

    • Environmental Challenges
    • Healthy Futures
    • Indigenous Knowledges
    • Data Cultures

    Earliest commencement date: Jan 27, 2020; latest commencement date Nov 1, 2020.

     Key documents

     Program Aims

    The scheme aims to be of benefit to the Visiting Scholars, SSN and Deakin more widely. It is designed to establish new collaborations and to make an important contribution to SSN’s (and Deakin’s) research culture. The visit should advance the Visiting Scholar’s own research and increase opportunities for collaboration with Deakin researchers.

    During their residency, Visiting Scholars will lead or participate in activities, such as:

    • Writing joint publications
    • Developing collaborative grant applications
    • Organising and presenting research seminars
    • Organising and presenting workshops for PhD candidates and Early Career Researchers (ECRs)
    • development of links with relevant industry, government and/or international partners

     Funding

    Visiting Scholars will receive complimentary accommodation at the Deakin Burwood or Geelong residential facilities and are eligible for a stipend of $500AUD a month. 

    Application process

    To be eligible, applicants must have either submitted their PhD for examination prior to the application closing date, or had their PhD conferred within the last twelve months prior to the application closing date (that is, PhD conferred 30th November 2018 or later).

    Interested scholars should, in the first instance, contact a scholar at Deakin whose work is aligned with that of the applicant, with a request to host their stay and support their application. Applicants will be hosted within a School or SRC, and all applications require the support of relevant Heads of Budget centre (School/SRC/Institute).

    With the support of a host and School/SRC, the applicant should then complete an application form and submit with:

    • A one-page CV of the host and,
    • A one-page CV of the proposed Visiting Scholar

    Document should be sent as a single pdf to ssn-info@deakin.edu.au with subject title ‘Visiting Scholars Program: Surname of host.

    Applications will be evaluated according to the following criteria:

    • The extent to which the research program of the Applicant is interdisciplinary, innovative and aligned with one or more SSN Themes
    • The Applicant’s track record of publications, collaboration and active contribution to academic life as a student and ECR
    • Existing links with Deakin academics or the potential for such links
    • The potential for the proposed research and associated activities to enrich the SSN and Deakin research environment

    Deadline for applications: 31 October 2019

    Successful applicants will be notified by the end of November 2019.

    If you have any questions of queries please contact: ssn-info@deakin.edu.au

    Click here to learn more about our visiting scholars from 2018.

Successful grant recipients

  • 2018

    Dr Kaja Antlej (co-investigator)

    Dr Kaja Antlej (co-investigator)

    Interdisciplinary Project Incubator:
    The social value of engineering and design heritage in post-industrial cities and its digital interpretation in a museum context’

    Collaboration with Deakin School of Engineering (Faculty of Science and the Built Environment), School of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Communication and Creative Arts, Coventry University and Aarhus University.

    “This interdisciplinary project is about how we can use extended reality technologies to communicate engineering and design heritage in post-industrial cities. We want to basically create a pop up museum experience, because we believe that it’s very important to go closer to the audience, and using technology to create something that is engaging, that’s meaningful. We believe it could bring new audiences to cultural institutions such as museums, libraries, or heritage centres.

    If we look at Geelong, which lost of a lot of traditional manufacturing capacities, I think it’s important to bring back this civic pride as well, through communicating those achievements throughout the history, and tell the future generations that what’s now coming to Geelong – all this innovation, design, advanced manufacturing – it’s actually as a result of this tradition for so many decades.

    We’re doing interviews with local leaders from education, heritage, government, tourism, and manufacturing. We’re also doing online surveys to talk to the local community. Once we’ve got these results, we will be able to analyse them and prepare participatory procreative workshops with the local communities, in which we will be able to evaluate what’s interesting for them from the interaction perspective and from the perspective of content.

    We have involved engineers who are going to develop this. We have designers who will be exploring different ways of 3D interaction within this VR, AR, or mixed reality or extended reality experience, and we have researchers from a heritage perspective as well.

    The grant scheme is a great initiative, because we have so many different and great researchers across one university, and this is the way how we can learn about each others’ skills and knowledge without going out of the university. And it’s a great platform as a pilot project that can lead into a bigger project to be competitive on a national or even international level.” 


    Dr Tiffany Shellam (co-investigator)

    Dr Tiffany Shellam (co-investigator)

    Interdisciplinary Project Incubator:
    Two-way Science: Assembling Ichthyology, Nyungar Knowledge and History in Robert Neill’s Fish collection’.

    Collaboration with Menang Nyungar Knowledge holders, Deakin School of Humanities and Social Sciences, Western Australian Museum, University of Western Australia, National Museum of Scotland.

    “It’s an interdisciplinary project where we’ve got historians, fish scientists, curators and Menang Indigenous knowledge holders in Albany, WA.

    We are unpacking together this historical fish collection that was caught by Nyungar men in the 1840s and they were preserved and stored in Edinburgh, where they are now in the National Museum of Scotland. With these specimens, manuscript notes and historical sketches of the fish, we tried to understand the Indigenous knowledge that is held within them and also the scientific knowledge that is captured from that time as well.

    I think it’s really exciting to have this richness of different ways of exploring one particular historical collection.

    One of the major challenges (and opportunities) is to think about how I explain myself beyond my discipline, so communicating in a much more lateral way. It’s been such a great opportunity to meet all these different people and other areas that I wouldn’t normally contact. We actually found we’ve got a lot in common; our interests are very similar though we are in different disciplines. It’s been really, really wonderful and I feel like it’s a very exciting new beginning, this moment in my career, to work in this way. It’s great.”


    Dr Thuong Hoang, Dr Greg Bowtell and Dr Jordan Vincent

    Dr Thuong Hoang, Dr Greg Bowtell and Dr Jordan Vincent

    Interdisciplinary Project Incubator:
    ‘Embodiment of Musical Performances through Emerging Technologies‘.

    Collaboration with Deakin Motion.Lab, School of Communication and Creative Arts (Faculty of Arts and Education), Deakin School of IT (Faculty of Science and the Built Environment) and Australian National Academy of Music.

    “Our project is basically looking at musical performances and trying to capture and convey the aliveness and physicalities of it.

    We’re using a range of different technologies, including motion capture, heartbeat, heart rate sensor, eye tracking, thermal cameras hopefully. Essentially, we’re trying to get a holistic view of live musical performance through data capture.

    We’re trying to get some sort of read on the emotional response of the actual performance. Then, the idea is to create a visualisation that represents the entirety of the performance as far as you can take it… as far as we can take it with the technology we have.

    The Australian National Academy of Music was an industry partner that we had on a project we were already working on, so what the SSN scheme has allowed us to do is to formalise the work that we’ve been doing, and of course, a little bit of funding is always fantastic.”


    Dr Luke Heemsbergen

    Dr Luke Heemsbergen

    Interdisciplinary Establishment Grant:
    ‘Disrupting Imagined Futures: Backcasting Health and Body Implications of 3D printing in Australia and Abroad‘.

    Collaboration with Anatomics (Melbourne), Shapeways (New York) and ARC Training Centre in Additive Biomanufacturing.  

    “My project is concerned with the use of 3D printing in medical practice, and we’re trying to think about how the decentralised sharing of designs and manufacture will affect clinical care. So what I’ve done is I’ve invited in some really interesting people from literal brain surgeons to medical ethicists. It’s this really interesting mix of ethicists and practitioners to manufacturers, people who make 3D printing systems.

    It’s a back casting project which means we start with a specified future and then consider what paths we need to take in terms of policy and technology and social developments to get to that future. This is a methodology that has been used in policy circles for a while, around things like climate change.

    There’s all kinds of legal and social issues as well as ethical issues that come up, and so we’re just going to work through those and the project is there to pull these out and then figure out what kind of collaborations we can move on to once those futures are kind of charted.

    I actually just get to choose awesome people who are doing amazing work in ways that are disparately amazing, yet they’re connected in some way and I just get to tie them all together, so that’s been so far a lot of fun and I’ll see what comes from it.”


    Jane Duffy (co-investigator)

    Jane Duffy (co-investigator)

    Interdisciplinary Establishment Grant:
    ‘Teaching professionalism: What can colleagues in HASS and STEM disciplines learn from each other, and what are the opportunities for interdisciplinary research?

    In partnership with Deakin School of Medicine (Faculty of Health).

    “The project is about teaching of professionalism and my colleague Evie Kendall and I were very aware that lots of programs teach professionalism at Deakin, but we weren’t aware of any collaboration or discussion between academics with expertise in this area.

    At this stage we’ve got participation from quite a few of the schools in the Faculty of Health, so Medicine – my school, Psychology, Nursing, Midwifery and Dietetics. Then as far as disciplines outside of health, we’ve found some key people in Law, IT and Education. What we’ve managed to do is get people who were very generous in giving up their time to come to a workshop, who have real experience and expertise in the area and seem very keen to do some collaboration.

    It’s provided the impetus to get the key players in the one room and I now have at least an informal network at Deakin of people who have more experience than I do in teaching professionalism.”


    Dr Rose Woodcock (co-investigator)

    Dr Rose Woodcock (co-investigator)

    Interdisciplinary Project Incubator:
    ‘Virtual Reality Applications for the Treatment of Amblyopia’

    Collaboration with Deakin School of Medicine (Faculty of Health) and School of Communication and Creative Arts (Faculty of Arts and Education).

    “We’re a multidisciplinary team: Game design, animation, vision sciences, optometry, and VR technology. Principally, it was the VR and game design coming together with the vision science team, because that technology was really important as a platform in which to do this research and testing towards a treatment for amblyopia. If you’re going to have a VR, you’re going to have things moving, you need animators, so there’ll also be 3D animators eventually. You also need to understand human binocular vision.

    Our project is led by Geoff Sampson from the School of Medicine. The whole research team now has a good understanding of what amblyopia is, why it’s got to be treated in certain ways rather than others, and so on. So, it’s a kind of a sharing of knowledge, a sharing of language.

    It’s given us insight into how to go about putting a team together, writing an application; what do you then have to do to really get that application absolutely watertight, the language that you use, making sure that it’s really clear and not full of jargon.”