Grant recipients and projects

  • 2021

    Moving the Next Generation: Testing a motor skill assessment sensor wear App with teachers in schools

    Moving the Next Generation: Testing a motor skill assessment sensor wear App with teachers in schools

    Dr Natalie Lander (lead CI, pictured), A/Proff Eduarda Sousa- Sá, A/Prof Lisa Barnett, A/Prof Shady Mohamed, Dr Darius Nahavandi, Dr Steven Lewis, Prof Mike Duncan

    Motor competence (MC) is positively associated with higher levels of social and cognitive development, self-perception, physical activity and physical fitness. The childhood years provide a critical window of opportunity to develop MC, as such, it is a priority of national and international Health and Physical Education curriculums. In spite of its importance, low levels of MC in children remains a global health concern. Existing MC assessment is challenging due to time, cost, resources and training needs, resulting in minimal application and limited remediation. A MC assessment using Inertial Measurement Units (IMUs) has been developed by HASS scientists Dr Lander and A/Prof Barnett in collaboration with STEM scientists A/Prof Mohamed and Dr Nahavandi. This prototype uses four IMUs with a Windows surface tablet. Motion data is streamed in real time to the tablet highlighting specific areas in need of improvement. The proposed SSN funding will be used to i) refine the prototype for use by teachers, and ii) to test implementation effectiveness of the App when used by teachers in schools.  


    Ageing in rural and regional Victoria during COVID-19: A pilot study of representations and perceptions of older people in the Geelong region

    Ageing in rural and regional Victoria during COVID-19: A pilot study of representations and perceptions of older people in the Geelong region

    Dr Cynthia Forlini (lead CI, pictured), Dr Christopher Mayes, A/Prof Kristy Hess, Dr Lisa Mitchell, Ms Courtney Hempton, Prof Alison Hutchison

    This study examines perceptions and representations of older people in rural and regional Australia during COVID-19, which may include instances of ageism, stigma, and stereotype. First, we will analyse how older people are represented in local media outlets during COVID-19. Then, will conduct a pilot survey and interviews with stakeholders in the community (i.e. older people, general public, healthcare professionals, journalists) to examine the impact the representations of older people in the media are having on the policies (e.g. selective lockdowns) and professional practices (e.g. healthcare and journalism) that support and/or influence health and wellbeing.


    Immortalising organs: A feminist study of emerging placental technologies

    Immortalising organs: A feminist study of emerging placental technologies

    Dr Jaya Keaney (lead CI, pictured), Dr Jacqueline Dalzeill, Dr Marnie Winter, A/Prof Neera Bhatia, A/Prof Dominique Martin

    Although pivotal to maternal and foetal health, the placenta is still not well understood, constraining scientific research on critical conditions like preeclampsia and foetal growth restriction. This is due in part to a lack of appropriate research models: animal placentas are inaccurate mimics, and human placenta donated from births and terminations has a limited research life. However, new biotechnologies are changing this. Emerging in recent years, placental organoids and placenta-on-chip models allow for placental cells to be cultured and grown indefinitely, or “immortalised”. This project explores new placental technologies from a feminist perspective, considering crucial questions of consent, ownership, commodification and antenatal care that emerge as these technologies reshape placenta research practices. 


    Revealing the risks: Exploring the social implications of technology that allows individuals to use intuitive smart-wear to potentially recognise invisible viral threats

    Revealing the risks: Exploring the social implications of technology that allows individuals to use intuitive smart-wear to potentially recognise invisible viral threats

    Dr Negin Amini (lead CI, pictured), Dr Monique Mann, Ms Courtney Hempton, Dr Tanya King, Prof Jennifer Loy

    In a ‘COVID normal’ future, with viral threats potentially loose in the environment, engineers could develop wearable garments to allow individuals to detect significantly high temperatures in others, and to signal their own temperature. Yet the form of these technologies and the social and ethical implications need to be considered in order to ensure that potential defences do not unreasonably undermine individual rights and the defence of the potentially vulnerable in society. The development of such technologies requires an interdisciplinary approach to ensure design and potential implementation is informed by practicalities of the technology and user interaction, in addition to social and ethical considerations.


    An app for that: COVID-19 contact tracing, public health and public goods

    An app for that: COVID-19 contact tracing, public health and public goods

    Dr Monique Mann (lead CI, pictured), Dr Luke Heemsbergen, Professor Catherine Bennett, Associate Professor Paul Cooper, Associate Professor Martin Hensher

    This project explores digital health technologies to better understand their role and contributions to public health and other public goods in the context of COVID-19 in Australia. Effective and efficient contact tracing systems are required as we enter into a new “COVID normal”. Yet, there are a range of open empirical questions regarding efficacy of contact tracing applications, and their contribution to public health in this large-scale social experiment. There is an even bigger question about whether we really need an app for that and if an app for that is the right solution to the problems posed by COVID-19.


  • 2020

    The Future of Australian Public Health Care: Interdisciplinary Perspectives

    The Future of Australian Public Health Care: Interdisciplinary Perspectives

    Interdisciplinary Project Incubator

    Dr Carolyn Holbrook (lead CI, pictured), Prof David Lowe, Prof Catherine Bennett, Dr Paul Crosland, Prof Matthew Ricketson, Dr Richie Barker

    A collaboration between School of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Health and Social Development, and the School of Communication and Creative Arts

    Medicare is one of the pillars of Australian civic society—it is emblematic of the Australian tradition of state intervention to promote the health and well-being of its citizens. The future viability of the public health system is among the most pressing problems facing our nation. We are familiar with concerns about the ageing population, and the increased pressure on under- resourced public hospitals. Recently, we have heard much about the rising cost and unsustainability of a private health care system that is subsidised by the state to the tune of $6 billion annually, yet continues to be abandoned at an alarming rate by unsatisfied customers. This project aims to provide insights into future directions for Australian public health policy by enhancing understanding of links between service access and efficacy and the status of Medicare as a cultural entity. It will: 1) use surveys to examine the impact of attitudes to Medicare on healthcare setting behaviour, 2) study the economic arguments underpinning the role of Medicare in Australia, 3) examine the policy history of health funding, 4) conduct a cultural history of Medicare, 5) study representations and perceptions of Medicare as a brand, and 6) study health policy reportage in Australian media from 1980 to present.


    Gender and Australian Patent Application Outcomes

    Gender and Australian Patent Application Outcomes

    Interdisciplinary Project Incubator

    Dr Vicki Huang (lead CI, pictured), Dr Sue Finch

    A collaboration between Business & Law and Statistics

    For the past two decades, successive Australian governments have sought to increase the participation of women in STEM-related fields. One reason for this is the advancement of social equality; another reason is the popular theory that STEM-based- innovation is and will be a primary driver of future economic growth. Rigorous intellectual property law (particularly patent law), supports this strategy by facilitating the commercialisation of innovative ideas. A patent provides the inventor(s) with an opportunity to monetise their work, and (in exchange) the technology disclosed can be used by the public to further scientific progress. One measure of female participation in STEM, is participation as an inventor in the patents system. There is some evidence that Australian patent applications with female inventors have increased over the last 30 years. However, while applications have increased, it is unclear whether women are as successful as men in having their patent application proceed to grant. This project seeks to discover whether women receive less favourable outcomes than men when applying for an Australian patent. It aims to attach a probable gender (female, male or unclear) to Australian patent applications filed between 2000 and 2014. This project will examine whether gender is related to a range of outcomes including rates of rejection, claim revision, citation rates and field of technology.


    Rethinking Tourette Syndrome: bridging the neurological/qualitative literature

    Rethinking Tourette Syndrome: bridging the neurological/qualitative literature

    Interdisciplinary Project Incubator

    A/Prof Tim Silk (Lead CI, pictured), Dr Daniel Corp, Jordan Morrison-Ham; Prof Jack Reynolds, Dr Lisa Curtis-Wendlandt, and A/Prof Daryl Efron

    A collaboration between the Cognitive Neuroscience Unit, School of Humanities and Social Science, and the Murdoch Children’s Research Institute

    Tourette Syndrome (TS) is a common neurodevelopmental condition thought to affect around 1% of children worldwide, and persisting into adulthood in many cases. As a tic disorder, TS is characterized by multiple motor and one or more vocal tics at some time during the illness, the waxing and waning of tics over a period of more than 1 year, and onset before the age of 18 years. Tics are extremely diverse, ranging from simple motor and vocal tics (e.g. blinking, sniffing) to complex movements and utterances that can appear purposeful. To date most TS research has been patho-physiologically focused on underlying brain mechanisms with little attention directed to the lived experience of patients. This means that treatment of TS has been largely biologically focused, and the characteristic experiences and mode of selfhood at stake have not yet been addressed. To put it another way, philosophy has not yet been heavily involved, despite burgeoning work in phenomenological psychiatry concerning anomalous self-experience, which has given significant attention to the kinds of experiences of selfhood and other-relations in schizophrenia and depression. We propose to build a team across Deakin and the Murdoch Children’s Research Institute to set up an interdisciplinary group to better bridge these fields of TS scholarship and enable the first-personal and third-personal dimensions to mutually enrich one another. In addition, we have a proposal for how to effect this change which we want to pilot, juxtaposing both cognitive neuroscience and qualitative phenomenological interviews.


    Tomorrow’s Country: creating better pathways for cultural fire research

    Tomorrow’s Country: creating better pathways for cultural fire research

    Interdisciplinary Project Incubator

    Dr Timothy Neale (lead CI, pictured), Professor Euan Ritchie, Dr Will Smith, and Dr Tim Doherty

    A collaboration between the Alfred Deakin Institute for Citizenship and Globalisation, the School of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Science, Engineering and Built Environment, the Dja Dja Wurrung Clans Aboriginal Corporation, and the Department of Environment, Land, Water and Planning

    Over the past decade, there has been increased interest and attention paid to the long history of Aboriginal peoples’ fire management practices across Australia and how this knowledge may help address biodiversity and fire management challenges. In Victoria, this renewed interest has been paralleled by an increasing level of recognition and partnership between Traditional Owners and state government agencies engaged in land management. Despite enthusiasm surrounding these initiatives, their establishment and expansion is hindered by insufficient scientific evidence surrounding their benefits to Country and community. While evidence on these topics exists for northern Australia, many deem this to be of uncertain relevance – ecologically and socially speaking – to the Victorian and southeast Australian context. Our project will help ameliorate this lack of supporting research, which is necessary for the realisation of Traditional Owners’ fire management aspirations.


    Predictive Policing in Australia: the Technical, Legal, and Social Challenges

    Predictive Policing in Australia: the Technical, Legal, and Social Challenges

    Interdisciplinary Project Incubator

    Dr Diarmaid Harkin (lead CI, pictured), Prof Debi Ashenden, Dr Leonard Hoon, Prof Marilyn McMahon, Dr Thao Phan, Dr Tyson Yunkaporta, Dr Ian Warren, Dr Monique Mann

    A collaboration between the Alfred Deakin Institute, the Applied Artificial Intelligence Institute, School of Business and Law, School of Humanities and Social Sciences, Institute for Koori Education, and the Centre for Cyber Security

    There is a global trend of police departments using algorithms and software-driven decision- making to target individuals or geographic places for law enforcement efforts. Known as ‘predictive policing’, there have been experiments with this technology in the United States, England, Germany, Switzerland, and China. This research project investigates the impact of software-driven decision-making within Australian policing. It offers an important policy perspective that brings together technical expertise from AI and cybersecurity, with law, criminology, and social scientists in Indigenous and technology studies. Public authorities within Australia are adopting algorithmic support and the field of law enforcement is a high-stakes domain where experimentation with this technology is questionable. It is of pressing importance that software which informs police decision-making is suitably scrutinised and critiqued.


    Incentivising Crowd-powered Computing for Smart Cities

    Incentivising Crowd-powered Computing for Smart Cities

    Interdisciplinary Establishment Grant

    Dr Niroshinie Fernando (lead CI, pictured), Prof Send W. Loke, A/Prof Lubna Alam

    A collaboration between the School of IT and the Faculty of Business and Law

    This research will investigate how smart cities can use crowdsourcing to provision a collective cloud of computational resources. Smart cities require support for high-velocity and real-time services involving sensor data, such as autonomous vehicles, environmental monitoring and connected wearables, needing geographically distributed computing resources that are fault- tolerant, trustworthy and highly available. One approach to enable the above is to crowdsource computing resources by enabling users to share their own computing devices. Our project seeks to explore how smaller scale problems can use the collective computational power at local (city) level, and exploit on-the-fly resource encounters. Specifically, this research will explore: 1) what are the characteristics of problems that can benefit from citizen-powered, on-the- fly, decentralised computing? 2) why users will participate and how can users be incentivised to participate? and 3) how can such incentive schemes be technically implemented?


    Shifting the Flow: Development of a virtual reality journey through an Australian wetland

    Shifting the Flow: Development of a virtual reality journey through an Australian wetland

    Interdisciplinary Establishment Grant

    Dr Melissa Wartman (lead CI, pictured)

    A collaboration between the Centre for Integrated Ecology, Deakin Cadet VR Lab, Deakin Motion Lab, Marshmallow Laser Feast, Streamline Media, VRTOV

    I have recently joined the Blue Carbon Lab to lead the Coastal Victorian Restoration Program that is restoring degraded saltmarsh wetlands along the Victorian coast. These amazing ecosystems do so much for humans, yet remain severely underappreciated and valued. Keeping them healthy is critical to maintain clean water, sequester carbon, and to support wildlife and fish populations.​ ​Unfortunately, the rate of loss of wetlands (driven mostly by human activities) is estimated to be among the highest of any ecosystem on the planet.​ Harnessed with the scientific knowledge about saltmarsh wetlands and other “Blue Carbon” ecosystems, I wish to explore how to bridge the gap of translating complex scientific information to the general public in a way that evokes interest and emotion. I will host an interdisciplinary 1-day workshop to bring together artists, scientists (STEM and HASS) and educators to discuss and develop ideas for using virtual reality to translate and educate Blue Carbon science concepts to the general public. The aim of this activity is to have an open table discussion about key concepts in Blue Carbon science that can easily be translated into an interactive artistic experience, while still providing an educational message. I will also participate in a 1-week training program in February 2020 to learn basic skills in Virtual Reality production. ​I will learn about the basic VR technologies including headset technology, LiDAR (remote sensing technology), tethered virtual reality, and body tracking.


    Developing a knowledge-based system for identifying and mapping student learning in mathematics using rich student assessment data

    Developing a knowledge-based system for identifying and mapping student learning in mathematics using rich student assessment data

    Interdisciplinary Establishment Grant

    Dr Lihua Xu (lead CI, pictured), Dr Wei Luo, A/Prof Jianxin Li

    A collaboration between the School of Education and the School of Information Technology

    This interdisciplinary collaboration aims to explore and develop novel approaches to analyse rich student assessment data in mathematics, to provide crucial evidence for innovations in teaching and learning in schools. It draws on the great potential of the latest technology breakthroughs in Artificial Intelligence, particularly in the machine learning approaches suitable for learning analytics, to identify and map student learning in mathematics using a wide range of student assessment data that has not been dealt with extensively in learning analytics, including audio/visual records of student classroom interactions, student artefacts, and other student assessment data types collected regularly by their classroom teachers. Two major activities are proposed: 1) interdisciplinary workshops to exchange ideas and methods in each discipline and to discuss scoping and study designs of potential research projects; and 2) a literature review focusing on learning analytics and assessment data in the context of school mathematics.


    Using Open Data for Interdisciplinary Research: Workshop and Speed-Meeting

    Using Open Data for Interdisciplinary Research: Workshop and Speed-Meeting

    Interdisciplinary Establishment Grant

    Dr Vicki Huang (lead CI, pictured)

    A collaboration between the Faculty of Business and Law, IP Australia, and CSIRO Data 61

    The use of open data and large-scale data analytics is rare in law and other HASS fields. This is likely due to a lack of awareness of data availability and a lack of skills to explore that data. For example, in relation to the former, there is little awareness amongst (at least) law academics of the Government’s various initiatives to make data open and accessible specifically for academic research. In relation to skills with data, there is a lack of awareness by HASS researchers of the work done by STEM academics; their more advanced use of large data sets and affinity for working in teams. For example, in law, there is a cultural preference for sole-authored works. This grant will be used to run a workshop on Government open data initiaties for academics, followed by a ‘speed-meeting’ session between HASS and STEM researchers. The broad research topic addressed will be: “How can analysis of big data enhance interdisciplinary research?”


    Artificial Intelligence in Science and Fiction

    Artificial Intelligence in Science and Fiction

    Interdisciplinary Establishment Grant  

    Dr Helen Young (lead CI, pictured), Dr Leonard Hoon, Dr Evie Kendal, Dr Thao Phan, Professor Sean Redmond

    A collaboration between the School of Communication and Creative Arts, School of Medicine, Alfred Deakin Institute, and the Applied Artificial Intelligence Institute

    How can culture shape the data-driven future of artificial intelligence (AI) and how it impacts on the human world? AI, by definition, can make decisions autonomously from any direct human control. Everyday people can already be affected by AI decisions in areas as varied as education, finance, the law and medicine as well as in digital spaces such as social media and chatbots. Recent scholarship in AI ethics argues that socio-cultural values must be embedded in AI reasoning from the design stage and identifies a need for new methodologies to “elicit the values held by all stakeholders, and make them explicit.” Public consultations, such as those recently conducted by the CSIRO and Standards Australia, seek input from experts, industry, and government bodies but have typically failed to generate high levels of input from the general public. Popular culture, particularly science fiction, offers a largely untapped living archive of information about social attitudes and beliefs about AI. This project aims to explore how that archive might be used to promote value-driven design (VDD) in AI, by piloting a new methodology that incorporates an ethics-in-literature approach to VDD.


  • 2019

    The social value of engineering and design heritage in post-industrial cities and its digital interpretation in a museum context

    The social value of engineering and design heritage in post-industrial cities and its digital interpretation in a museum context

    Interdisciplinary Project Incubator

    Dr Kaja Antlej (co-investigator, pictured)

    A collaboration with Deakin School of Engineering (Faculty of Science and the Built Environment), School of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Communication and Creative Arts, Coventry University and Aarhus University.

     

    “This interdisciplinary project is about how we can use extended reality technologies to communicate engineering and design heritage in post-industrial cities. We want to basically create a pop up museum experience, because we believe that it’s very important to go closer to the audience, and using technology to create something that is engaging, that’s meaningful. We believe it could bring new audiences to cultural institutions such as museums, libraries, or heritage centres.

    If we look at Geelong, which lost of a lot of traditional manufacturing capacities, I think it’s important to bring back this civic pride as well, through communicating those achievements throughout the history, and tell the future generations that what’s now coming to Geelong – all this innovation, design, advanced manufacturing – it’s actually as a result of this tradition for so many decades.

    We’re doing interviews with local leaders from education, heritage, government, tourism, and manufacturing. We’re also doing online surveys to talk to the local community. Once we’ve got these results, we will be able to analyse them and prepare participatory procreative workshops with the local communities, in which we will be able to evaluate what’s interesting for them from the interaction perspective and from the perspective of content.

    We have involved engineers who are going to develop this. We have designers who will be exploring different ways of 3D interaction within this VR, AR, or mixed reality or extended reality experience, and we have researchers from a heritage perspective as well.

    The grant scheme is a great initiative, because we have so many different and great researchers across one university, and this is the way how we can learn about each others’ skills and knowledge without going out of the university. And it’s a great platform as a pilot project that can lead into a bigger project to be competitive on a national or even international level.”


    Two-way Science: Assembling Ichthyology, Nyungar Knowledge and History in Robert Neill's Fish collection

    Two-way Science: Assembling Ichthyology, Nyungar Knowledge and History in Robert Neill's Fish collection

    Interdisciplinary Project Incubator

    A/Prof Tiffany Shellam (co-investigator, pictured)

    A collaboration with Menang Nyungar Knowledge holders, Deakin School of Humanities and Social Sciences, Western Australian Museum, University of Western Australia, National Museum of Scotland.

     

    “It’s an interdisciplinary project where we’ve got historians, fish scientists, curators and Menang Indigenous knowledge holders in Albany, WA.

    We are unpacking together this historical fish collection that was caught by Nyungar men in the 1840s and they were preserved and stored in Edinburgh, where they are now in the National Museum of Scotland. With these specimens, manuscript notes and historical sketches of the fish, we tried to understand the Indigenous knowledge that is held within them and also the scientific knowledge that is captured from that time as well.

    I think it’s really exciting to have this richness of different ways of exploring one particular historical collection.

    One of the major challenges (and opportunities) is to think about how I explain myself beyond my discipline, so communicating in a much more lateral way. It’s been such a great opportunity to meet all these different people and other areas that I wouldn’t normally contact. We actually found we’ve got a lot in common; our interests are very similar though we are in different disciplines. It’s been really, really wonderful and I feel like it’s a very exciting new beginning, this moment in my career, to work in this way. It’s great.”


    Embodiment of Musical Performances through Emerging Technologies

    Embodiment of Musical Performances through Emerging Technologies

    Interdisciplinary Project Incubator

    Co-investigators Dr Thuong Hoang, Dr Greg Bowtell and Dr Jordan Vincent (pictured)

    A collaboration with Deakin Motion.Lab, School of Communication and Creative Arts (Faculty of Arts and Education), Deakin School of IT (Faculty of Science and the Built Environment) and Australian National Academy of Music

     

    “Our project is basically looking at musical performances and trying to capture and convey the aliveness and physicalities of it.

    We’re using a range of different technologies, including motion capture, heartbeat, heart rate sensor, eye tracking, thermal cameras hopefully. Essentially, we’re trying to get a holistic view of live musical performance through data capture.

    We’re trying to get some sort of read on the emotional response of the actual performance. Then, the idea is to create a visualisation that represents the entirety of the performance as far as you can take it… as far as we can take it with the technology we have.

    The Australian National Academy of Music was an industry partner that we had on a project we were already working on, so what the SSN scheme has allowed us to do is to formalise the work that we’ve been doing, and of course, a little bit of funding is always fantastic.”


    Disrupting Imagined Futures: Backcasting Health and Body Implications of 3D printing in Australia and Abroad

    Disrupting Imagined Futures: Backcasting Health and Body Implications of 3D printing in Australia and Abroad

    Interdisciplinary Establishment Grant

    Dr Luke Heemsbergen (Chief Investigator, pictured)

    A collaboration with Anatomics (Melbourne), Shapeways (New York) and ARC Training Centre in Additive Biomanufacturing.  

     

    “My project is concerned with the use of 3D printing in medical practice, and we’re trying to think about how the decentralised sharing of designs and manufacture will affect clinical care. So what I’ve done is I’ve invited in some really interesting people from literal brain surgeons to medical ethicists. It’s this really interesting mix of ethicists and practitioners to manufacturers, people who make 3D printing systems.

    It’s a back casting project which means we start with a specified future and then consider what paths we need to take in terms of policy and technology and social developments to get to that future. This is a methodology that has been used in policy circles for a while, around things like climate change.

    There’s all kinds of legal and social issues as well as ethical issues that come up, and so we’re just going to work through those and the project is there to pull these out and then figure out what kind of collaborations we can move on to once those futures are kind of charted.

    I actually just get to choose awesome people who are doing amazing work in ways that are disparately amazing, yet they’re connected in some way and I just get to tie them all together, so that’s been so far a lot of fun and I’ll see what comes from it.”


    Teaching professionalism: What can colleagues in HASS and STEM disciplines learn from each other, and what are the opportunities for interdisciplinary research?

    Teaching professionalism: What can colleagues in HASS and STEM disciplines learn from each other, and what are the opportunities for interdisciplinary research?

    Interdisciplinary Establishment Grant

     

    Jane Duffy (co-investigator, pictured)

    In partnership with Deakin School of Medicine (Faculty of Health).

     

    “The project is about teaching of professionalism and my colleague Evie Kendal and I were very aware that lots of programs teach professionalism at Deakin, but we weren’t aware of any collaboration or discussion between academics with expertise in this area.

    At this stage we’ve got participation from quite a few of the schools in the Faculty of Health, so Medicine – my school, Psychology, Nursing, Midwifery and Dietetics. Then as far as disciplines outside of health, we’ve found some key people in Law, IT and Education. What we’ve managed to do is get people who were very generous in giving up their time to come to a workshop, who have real experience and expertise in the area and seem very keen to do some collaboration.

    It’s provided the impetus to get the key players in the one room and I now have at least an informal network at Deakin of people who have more experience than I do in teaching professionalism.”


    Virtual Reality Applications for the Treatment of Amblyopia

    Virtual Reality Applications for the Treatment of Amblyopia

    Interdisciplinary Project Incubator

    Dr Rose Woodcock (co-investigator, pictured)

    A collaboration with Deakin School of Medicine (Faculty of Health) and School of Communication and Creative Arts (Faculty of Arts and Education).

     

    “We’re a multidisciplinary team: Game design, animation, vision sciences, optometry, and VR technology. Principally, it was the VR and game design coming together with the vision science team, because that technology was really important as a platform in which to do this research and testing towards a treatment for amblyopia. If you’re going to have a VR, you’re going to have things moving, you need animators, so there’ll also be 3D animators eventually. You also need to understand human binocular vision.

    Our project is led by Geoff Sampson from the School of Medicine. The whole research team now has a good understanding of what amblyopia is, why it’s got to be treated in certain ways rather than others, and so on. So, it’s a kind of a sharing of knowledge, a sharing of language.

    It’s given us insight into how to go about putting a team together, writing an application; what do you then have to do to really get that application absolutely watertight, the language that you use, making sure that it’s really clear and not full of jargon.”